Please note.

Due to the limited wall space available in the showroom, it is not guaranteed that all of the barometers listed for sale will be on view at all times. Please contact us before travelling to view a particular barometer and we will make sure it is available for your visit.

Unless otherwise stated the listed prices below include delivery within a 50 mile radius of Ashbourne. We deliver personally (no couriers) and are happy to deliver to all areas, please contact us if you require delivery outside of the 50 radius or for prices excluding delivery.

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Stick Barometers Currently Available

  • Ramsden, London.c.1785.Bowfront
  • Ramsden, London. c.1770-75.(Sold)
  • G. Adams, London. c.1787-1795.(Sold)
  • Ramsden, London. c. 1790.Bowfront. (Sold)
  • Nairne, London. c.1765.(Sold)
  • Polty, Edinburgh. c.1810.(Sold)
  • Anonymous. c.1730-40.
  • Cox, London. c.1825-30.(Bowfront)
  • Bapt. Ronchetti & Co. c.1790-1800.
  • Dollond , London. c.1825-30. (Sold)
  • Adams, London. c.1785.
  • Burton, London. c.1780.
  • Bulgarone. c.1810.
  • Dollond, London. c.1790.
  • J.Newman, London. c.1830. (Bowfront)
  • D. Manticha, London. c.1790-1800.
  • Millard & Son, London. c.1850-60.
  • Nairne, London. c.1770-80.
  • Sampson, Fecit. c.1800-10.
  • Stott, Dumfries. c.1780-90.
  • L. Belatti, Grantham. c.1810.(Angle)
  • Unsigned, Walnut. c.1860.


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Ramsden, London. c.1790.

A fine example of a George III 'flat to wall' mahogany bowfront stick barometer by the world renowned maker Jesse Ramsden, London. The ebony strung bowfronted case veneered with figured flame mahogany of rich colour, sits flat against the wall (a feature of the best quality stick and bow front barometers) with cushion moulded pediment. The finely engraved silvered scale plate is fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier scale, signed 'Ramsden, London'.
The canted corners of the base are inlaid with ebony lines, with the finely turned ebonised urn shaped cistern cover concealing the off set boxwood cistern and ebony mouldings.
"To own a Ramsden instrument, be it one of his great theodolites or one of the many sextants and barometers produced at his London workshop, was to own not only an instrument of incredible accuracy and great practical use, but also a thing of beauty."
Jesse Ramsden (b.1731-d.1800) was probably the greatest instrument maker of all time, an account of Ramsden's work is given in Banfield (Edwin) Barometer Maker's and Retailers, p.179 and Goodison (Nicholas) English Barometers, p.222.

Height 39". 

Reserved

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George Adams, London. c.1787-95.

A fine and rare Georgian stick barometer by this much sought after famous maker. The well figured mahogany veneered case with moulded architectural pediment and central turned brass finial. The silvered and engraved scale plate fitted with a manual vernier and is signed with the rarely seen ‘G. Adams, London, Instrument Maker to his Majesty and Optician to the Prince of Wales’in the cartouche. The exposed tube fitted with the original cistern behind the turned hemispherical mahogany cover.

(George Adams (Junior), born 1750-died 1795. He was apprenticed in 1765 to his father, also named George, inherited the business in 1773 after his father's death and continued to work at 60 Fleet Street until his death in 1795. With the inheritance of the business he succeeded to the title of Instrument Maker to George III and in 1787 became optician to the Prince of Wales(George IV). It was said that his instruments were at least as good as those of his father and he wrote many articles, dissertations and essays on scientific instruments.)

Height 40".

Sold.

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James Cox, London. c.1825.

An exceptional Regency period 'flat to wall' bowfront mahogany stick barometer of rare slender proportions by the London maker James Cox.
The 'flat to wall' case with cushion moulded pediment is veneered with the finest flame mahogany and edge strung with ebony. The equally slim ebonised urn cistern cover is flanked by chamfered corners to each side inlaid with ebony diamond decoration. The case is made to the pattern of the tradition bow-fronted barometer of the period but reduced to this very rare slender proportion.
('Flat to wall' barometers are the highest level of stick barometer cases, requiring specially made tubes and cisterns to allow the case to sit flush to the wall giving a very neat, elegant appearance).
The register plates, again finely proportioned are signed by the maker above the weather indications which are graduated from 27 to 31 inches. The plates are fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier.
The slim thermometer with its mahogany frame and bowed glass is set within the trunk, the well engraved silvered scale read the mercury filled thermometer on Fahrenheit scale.

Height: 38".

£6,350 Including delivery.

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Jesse Ramsden London. c.1775.

A truly exceptional and incredibly rare barometer by the most revered instrument maker Jesse Ramsden of London.

Ramsden is credited with inventing the form of pointer (or index) which enabled the meniscus of the mercury to be read without parallax, and with the ivory point method zeroing the mercury level in the cistern and the temperature compensation scale designed to allow for the thermal expansion of mercury. These features all allow for the most accurate reading of atmospheric pressure and are rarely found in domestic barometers, this instrument utilises all three: the ivory pointer; the double index and the compensation scale.

Everything about this instrument is designed for accuracy but housed in a very elegant mahogany case destined for a private house with a 'gentleman' owner with a serious interest in the 'philosophical' sciences of the Georgian era.

A Ramsden bow front barometer is something that all barometer collectors aspire to owning "one day", but this is more than a Ramsden barometer, it is a true Ramsden instrument which contains the great man's best efforts and thoughts on how to record the most accurate readings of the atmospheric pressure possible at the time. By far a rarer item than the later bow-fronted variety.

Who knows how many of these instruments were made, but even Goodison has only a 'contemporary drawing, dated 1772' of this barometer to show in his book, 'English Barometers 1680-1860' and discusses the features and merits of the instrument with never having seen an actual example, stating that at the time of writing he had ' yet to see an example by Ramsden' when discussing the scale of compensation for the effect temperature has on the reading of the pressure, the rear of the scale and the double pointer on this barometer are engraved with a number 3, possibly only the third of it's type. 

Height. 38".

Sold.

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J. Newman, London. c.1825-30.

Impressive and very attractive mahogany bowfronted stick barometer of the best quality by the leading scientific instrument maker of the period, John Newman of London, c.1825-30.The bow-fronted case with good full depth 'front to back' swan neck pediment with ebony mouldings , is veneered in the finest quality flame mahogany veneers of good colour. The barometer is fitted with a glazed bowed thermometer box containing a long mercury thermometer with a brass protective cover on a well engraved plate with both Reamur and Fahrenheit scales.
The base with canted corners inlaid with ebony lines with ebony mouldings to the bottom, with the ebonised turned urn shaped cistern cover concealing the boxwood cistern.
The silvered register plates are very well engraved with a 27"-31" scale and the makers name, 'J. Newman, 122 Regent Street, London'. The plates are fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier.
John Frederick Newman is listed as working in London from 7 & 8 Lisle Street between 1816-25 and then moving to 122 Regent Street until being taken over by Negretti & Zambra in 1862.
'He made standard and portable barometers for the Ross Antarctic expedition and his meteorological station barometers were installed throughout the British Empire. He exhibited at the Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in 1851 and was, without doubt, the leading scientific barometer maker of his day. The business was taken over by Negretti & Zambra in 1862'. (Edwin Banfield, 'Barometer Makers & Retailers 1660-1900).

Height 39"

£5,950 Including delivery.

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Stott, Dumfries. c.1780-90.

An unusual and early form of a mahogany bow front stick barometer with several unusual features, by Stott of Dumfries. The mahogany case with a straight moulded pediment and glazed hood sits above the bow fronted trunk and has an inlaid base with canted corners.
The silvered register plate is well engraved with a scale unusually measuring from 26"-31" of air pressure and signed 'Stott, Dumfries' with a manually operated vernier. Another unusual feature of this barometer is the way in which the vernier is adjusted, rather than sliding the marker up and down by hand (which would need the scale to be exposed or behind a glazed door) or a rack and pinion operated vernier (as is normal for a fixed glazed dial), the vernier is operated by a fixed rod raised and lowered by a small knob on the side of the trunk.
The base of the barometer with canted corners is decorated with an individualistic inlaid flower and satinwood inlaid panels on the canted corners, all very typical of the Sheraton period in the last quarter of the 18th century.
The original tube is concealed within the bow fronted case and fitted with a rare concertina boxwood cistern (click on 'more images' below).

(A bowfront barometer with the same concertina cistern by Stott is illustrated and discussed as an early example in Nicolas Goodison's 'English Barometers 1680-1860' p.71,74 ,Plates 28 & 29).

Height 40"

£3,950 Including delivery.

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Polty, Edinburgh. c.1810.

A mahogany veneered Georgian stick barometer signed 'Polty, Edinburgh' c.1810. The edge moulded herring bone veneered carcase is outlined with chevron stringing with an architectural broken pediment sitting above the glazed door. The exposed tube terminates with the glass bulb cistern concealed behind the turned mahogany cistern cover.
The silvered register plate is engraved with a scale from 27" to 31" and fitted with a manual vernier and spirit filled thermometer and engraved with the makers name 'J. Polty, Edinburgh'.

Height 39".

Sold.

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Jesse Ramsden, London. c.1785.

An outstanding George III 'flat to wall' mahogany bowfront stick barometer by the world renowned maker Jesse Ramsden, London. The ebony strung bowfronted case veneered with figured flame mahogany of rich colour, sits flat against the wall (a feature of the best quality stick and bow front barometers) with cushion moulded pediment. The finely engraved silvered scale plate is fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier scale, signed 'Ramsden, London'.

The canted corners of the base are inlaid with ebony lines, with the finely turned ebonised urn shaped cistern cover concealing the off set boxwood cistern and ebony mouldings.

"To own a Ramsden instrument, be it one of his great theodolites or one of the many sextants and barometers produced at his London workshop, was to own not only an instrument of incredible accuracy and great practical use, but also a thing of beauty."

Jesse Ramsden (b.1731-d.1800) was probably the greatest instrument maker of all time.

In 1775, invented a semi-automatic dividing machine, capable of marking graduated scales on sextants and other nautical and astronomical instruments. Developed improvements in the manufacture of sextants, theodolites, barometers, micrometers, and countless other devices. One of the most important instruments built by him is the great astronomical circle of the Palermo Observatory. In 1786, elected fellow of the Royal Society of London and, eight years later, member of the Imperial Academy of Saint Petersburg. In 1795, won the Copley Medal, the highest scientific award of his time: the prize was established in 1736 by the Royal Society, thanks to a bequest from Sir Godfrey Copley.

He set up his own business in Haymarket, St James's in 1768, and moved to 199 Piccadilly from 1772 until his death in 1800. An account of Ramsden's work is given in Banfield (Edwin) Barometer Maker's and Retailers, p.179 and Goodison (Nicholas) English Barometers, p.222. 

Height 39".

Sold.

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Anonymous. c.1730-40.

A very rare George II stained walnut stick barometer of exceptional quality.

The 'flat to wall' case, of fine colour and finish, is veneered in walnut with a moulded arched top and three brass ball and spire finials. The very fine and unusual features that show the high quality and rarity of this piece are the pierced lattice work cover that disguises the mercury tube fitted the front of the case and the finely carved gadrooned cistern cover. The engraved and silvered scales are fitted with a manual vernier with pivoting sickle shaped pointer and are protected by a hinged glazed brass door.

As is common with barometers from this period, the engraved silvered scale plate is unsigned, very few pre 1750 barometers were signed.

Height 40".

£7,950 Including delivery.

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Edward Nairne, London. c.1765.
A fine early example of a Georgian mahogany stick barometer by the eminent maker Edward Nairne of London. The shallow angled architectural pediment fitted above the edge moulded case with exposed tube is herring bone veneered in figured Cuban mahogany of good colour. The boldly turned elongated cistern cover is typical of mid 18th century barometers and earlier which helps date this particular to c.1765.
The silvered brass scale plate is well engraved with a scale reading 27" - 31" and weather indications and signed 'Nairne, London'.
Edward Nairne, 1726-1806. He was apprenticed to the optician Matthew Loft in 1741 and established his own business at 20 Cornhill in London after Loft's death in 1748. In 1774 he took his apprentice Thomas Blunt into partnership, a relationship that lasted until 1793 when Blunt opened his own shop at 22 Cornhill.
Edward Nairne was one of the best-known London barometer and scientific instrument makers in the second half of the 18th century in 1773 Nairne invented a special marine barometer with a narrow guage tube to contain any violent movements of the mercury. See 'English Barometers 1680-1860' by Nicholas Goodison p.186-189.

Height 39".

Sold.

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Bulgarone, c.1810.

A Georgian mahogany stick barometer, Bulgarone, c.1810. The herring bone veneered carcase is outlined with line inlays and edge moulded with broken pediment above the glazed door. The exposed tube terminates with the glass bulb cistern concealed behind the turned mahogany cistern cover.
The silvered register plate is engraved with a scale from 27" to 31" and fitted with a manual vernier and spirit filled thermometer, engraved with the makers name 'Bulgarone, Fecit'.

Height 39".

£1,575 Including delivery.

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Giovanni Baptista Ronchetti, Manchester. c.1790.

A rare design of 18th century Georgian stick barometer by Baptista Ronchetti of Manchester.
The mahogany edge moulded case with an early overhanging architectural broken pediment, inlaid decoration and turned cistern cover.
The long mercury filled thermometer is mounted on a well engraved silvered scale with engraved floral decoration, the scale is inset into the main body of the barometer. The main silvered register scale is again very well engraved with floral scrolling decoration and unusual Masonic symbols, the maker's name, 'Baptiste Ronchetti & Co.' engraved across the full width of the plate. The manual vernier marks the level of the mercury on the main tube, which on this barometer is the rare bayonet style tube which allows the main length of the tube to be concealed and by bending it then bringing the top of the tube forwards so that it can be read.

(One of the foremost of barometer makers, Giovanni Baptista Ronchetti, emigrated from Italy to Manchester from Tavernerio, near Lake Como, Italy in 1785. He worked from 15 High Street and was joined by his son and nephew and Dominic Bolongaro who all went their separate ways after a while. He is thought to have died circa 1810).

Height 41'.

£3,350 Including delivery.

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Dominick Manticha, London. c.1790-1800.

A fine Georgian mahogany stick barometer by this sought after early London maker, Dominick Manticha, c.1790-1800.
The case is mahogany veneered in the herring bone pattern and fitted with a broken pediment top. A particularily good feature is the glazed door, it is nicely shaped to match the shoulders of the case and edged with the same chequer stringing as the rest of the case. The exposed tube is fitted with an early bulb cistern tube which is concealed by a turned mahogany cistern cover with ebony and ivory roundel decoration. The silvered brass register plate is fitted with a manually operated vernier and engraved with the makers name, 'D. Manticha, Fecit'. The register plate also has a pair of Masonic symbols, a set of compasses and a square engraved, Manticha is known to have made other barometers bearing Masonic symbols.

Dominick Manticha was one of the leading group of the earliest Italian barometer makers, (including J.M Ronketti, Joseph Somalvico and James Gatty) that migrated into England in the last quarter of the 18th century,
he is listed as working from 1781-1805. (See Nicholas Goodison, English Barometers, 1680-1860 p.176-178).

 Height 39".

£2,150 Including delivery.

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Dollond, London. c.1790.

Good and unusual late 18th Century kingwood and mahogany stick barometer of smaller than usual proportions; the arched top with well engraved, silvered brass register plate with a manually operated vernier, signed 'Dollond, London'.
The case is unusually herringbone-veneered in kingwood rather than the typical mahogany , with exposed barometer tube with boxwood cistern concealed behind the turned mahogany hemispherical cistern cover.
The case is shorter than typical, measuring only 36" compared to the more typical 39" of other barometers of the same design.


The renowned family firm of barometer makers, Dollond, originated with Peter Dollond in 1750 who was appointed 'Optician and Instrument Maker to King George III', he took various members of his family into the business during the 18th century but it was his nephew George who continued the business upon Peter's death in 1820 with the business continuing on into the 20th century when it was taken over by the firm Aitchison, hence 'Dollond & Aitchison' the opticians. Most of the barometers made by the firm are just signed 'Dollond' rather than Peter or George etc, this barometer dates from c.1790, when Peter was the head of the firm but both he and George were active in the firm at this time.

Height. 36".

£2,950 Including delivery. 

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Burton, London. c.1780.

A superb and rare mahogany and figured walnut Georgian sick barometer by George of London, c.1780. The edge moulded mahogany case is veneered to the front with figured walnut, a very unusual and attractive feature. The architectural pediment sits above a large diameter adjustable hygrometer and brass scale plate. The engraved scale plate is fitted with a manual vernier guage and engraved with the maker' name, 'Burton, London'. The exposed tube is fitted with a boxwood cistern concealed behind a turned hemispherical cistern cover.

(Please note, the scale plate is polished brass at the moment but can readily be re-silvered should it be preferred).

George Burton is a noted instrument maker whose instruments including two barometers were taken on Captain James Cook's second voyage of discovery in 1772 and by William Gooch on his voyage to South America in 1792.

Banfield's 'Barometer Makers & Retailers, 1660-1900' lists him as working c.1772-1815 from 136 High Street, Southwark, London.

Height 45"

£4,450 Including Delivery.

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Edward Nairne, London. c.1770-80.

A good early George III mahogany stick barometer by the emminent maker Edward Nairne of London. The arch topped, edge moulded case with exposed tube is veneered in richly figured Cuban mahogany of good colour and fitted with a hemispherical turned cistern cover. The trunk of the case is slightly wider than that of later versions in a similar style, a feature of an earlier barometer.
The silvered brass scale plate is well engraved with a scale reading 27.5" - 31" and weather indications and signed 'Nairne, London'.

Edward Nairne, (1726-1806) was an important instrument maker during the second half of the 18th century. He was apprenticed to the optician Matthew Loft in 1741 and established his own business at 20 Cornhill in London after Loft's death in 1748. In 1774 he took his apprentice Thomas Blunt into partnership, a relationship that lasted until 1793 when Blunt opened his own shop at 22 Cornhill. Nairne devoloped the constricted marine tube in 1773, invented the rubber eraser and was elected a 'Fellow of the Royal Society in 1776. See 'English Barometers 1680-1860' by Nicholas Goodison p.186-189.

Height 38".

£2,950 Including delivery.

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Millard & Son, London. c.1860.

A very good quality Victorian oak stick barometer by Millard & Son, 334 Oxford St, London.c.1850-60.The substantial edge moulded, solid oak case is fitted with an ogee moulded pediment, detachable thermometer box and turned cistern cover. The engraved ivory register plates are fitted with rack and pinion operated verniers that record readings taken at '10 AM Today' and '10AM Yesterday'. The mercury thermometer is mounted on an ivory plate marked with both Reaumur and Fahrenhiet scales. The concealed wide-bore tube is fitted with a portable boxwood cistern beneath a detachable shaped cistern cover.

Thomas Millard & Son are recorded as working between 1840-95 from 245, 334 and 354 Oxford St. London. 

Height 40"

£1,350 Including delivery.

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Adams, London. c.1790.

Excellent early mahogany stick barometer by the important London maker Adams, c.1785. The round topped mahogany case with moulded edges is veneered with book matched Cuban mahogany, terminating with a turned hemispherical cistern cover. The silvered brass scale ,with considerable signs of age, fitted with a spirit filled thermometer and a manually operated vernier, is engraved with the maker's name and address, 'Adams, Fleet Street, London'.The exposed tube terminates with a box wood cistern concealed behind a hemispherical turned cistern cover and fitted with a portable screw.

(George Adams (Junior), born 1750-died 1795. He was apprenticed in 1765 to his father, also named George, inherited the business in 1772 and moved to 60 Fleet Street in 1773 until his death in 1795. With the inheritance of the business he became instrument maker to George III and later optician to the Prince of Wales(George IV).It was said that his instruments were at least as good as those of his father and he wrote many articles, dissertations and essays on scientific instruments.)

Height 38".

£2,450 Including delivery.

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Unsigned, Figured Walnut. c.1860.

Good Mid 19th Century Figured Walnut Stick Barometer, c.1860. Anonymous.
The round topped case is veneered in figured walnut of good colour, fitted to the trunk, the mercury thermometer mounted on a ceramic scale plate measuring both Reamur and Centigrade within a glazed box andterminating with a turned cistern cover which conceals the portable boxwood cistern.
The ceramic scale plates are marked with a 27-31" scale and fitted with double rack and pinion operated vernier gauges.

Height 37".

£1,395 Including delivery.

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Sampson, Fecit. c.1800-10.


Fine quality Georgian mahogany stick barometer by Sampson.
The case is veneered in the finest figured mahogany to the front and unusualy to the sides and outlined with ebony. The wide silvered scale and mercury thermometer is contained within a detachable thermometer box. The swan neck pediment sits above the lockable glazed door which protects the silvered brass scale which is fitted with a manual vernier and engraved 'Sampson, Fecit'.
The concealed tube is fitted with a portable boxwood cistern behind the turned mahogany cistern cover.

Height 39".

£3,450 Including delivery.

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Louis Bellatti, Grantham. c.1825.


Louis Bellatti, Grantham. c.1825.

Very rare, early 19thC mahogany angle barometer of unusual design by Louis Bellatti, Grantham.
The mahogany veneered case with moulded edges, hinged glazed door protecting the scale, shaped pediment and hemispherical turned cistern cover.
The silvered plate is well engraved with a scale registering 28"-31" over a length of 14", this gives the movement of the mercury a magnification of 4 1/2 times. The scale plate is fitted with a manually operated marker and signed 'L.Bellatti, Grantham'. An unusual feature for an angle barometer is the glazed hinged door which protects the plate.
Louis Bellatti is recorded as operating from High Street Grantham from at least 1822 and was a noted maker of angle barometers.
(This barometer is illustrated in Edwin Banfield's ' The Italian Influence On English Barometers From 1780' page 107.)

Height 38", Width 24".

£7,950.

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Ramsden, London. c.1790.

A fine example of a George III 'flat to wall' mahogany bowfront stick barometer by the world renowned maker Jesse Ramsden, London. The ebony strung bowfronted case veneered with figured flame mahogany of rich colour, sits flat against the wall (a feature of the best quality stick and bow front barometers) with cushion moulded pediment. The finely engraved silvered scale plate is fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier scale, signed 'Ramsden, London'.
The canted corners of the base are inlaid with ebony lines, with the finely turned ebonised urn shaped cistern cover concealing the off set boxwood cistern and ebony mouldings.
"To own a Ramsden instrument, be it one of his great theodolites or one of the many sextants and barometers produced at his London workshop, was to own not only an instrument of incredible accuracy and great practical use, but also a thing of beauty."
Jesse Ramsden (b.1731-d.1800) was probably the greatest instrument maker of all time, an account of Ramsden's work is given in Banfield (Edwin) Barometer Maker's and Retailers, p.179 and Goodison (Nicholas) English Barometers, p.222.

Height 39".

Sold.

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Dollond, London. c.1825-30.
Very impressive Regency bow-fronted London stick barometer of the highest quality. The bow-fronted case with 'ogee' moulded pediment, is veneered in the finest quality flame mahogany veneers of lovely colour. The barometer is fitted with a detachable glazed bowed thermometer box containing a long mercury thermometer on a very well engraved plate with a Fahrenheit scale.
The silvered register plates are again very well engraved with a 27"-31" scale and the makers name, 'Dollond, London'. The plates are fitted with a rack and pinion operated vernier.
The canted corners of the base are inlaid with ebony diamonds, with the ebonised turned urn shaped cistern cover concealing the boxwood cistern.
(The renowned Dollond family of instrument makers was founded by Peter Dollond circa 1750 and continued until the early 1900's when it was bought by Aitchison, hence Dollond and Aitchison .
This barometer was made during the period of George Dollond, (1774-1856) who continued the business after the death of his uncle, Peter, in 1820. He was instrument maker to Willian IV and Queen Victoria.)

Height 39".


Sold.

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Joseph Barelli & Co. Reading. c.1810.

A Georgian mahogany stick barometer, Barelli & Co. Reading. c.1810. The herring bone veneered carcase is outlined with chevron stringing and edge moulded with broken pediment above the glazed door. The exposed tube terminates with the glass bulb cistern concealed behind the turned mahogany cistern cover.
The silvered register plate is engraved with a scale from 27" to 31" and fitted with a manual vernier and spirit filled thermometer, engraved with the makers name 'Jos. Barelli & Co, Reading'.
Joseph Barelli is listed as working in Reading from 1800-1840.

H.39".
Sold.

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Archived Barometers.

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